Katy Perry’s Disembodied Head Takes to Augmented Reality for W Magazine

This week began with one of the world’s foremost fashion publications calling me to check a friend’s reference before hiring her as their first ever tech reporter. Fittingly, it’s ending with word of pop megastar Katy Perry gracing the cover of another big time fashion rag, W Magazine.

In AR.

Sam Reed, Hollywood Reporter:

Subscribers as well as readers in New York and L.A. will receive the limited-edition cover (on newsstands Aug.14), which shows the aforementioned floating head. Simply hover your device, which will become tethered to the page, over the image and tilt it this way or that way for a closer glimpse at Perry’s neck or perhaps her left or right ears (you know, whatever floats your boat), all without losing the high-gloss quality of the image.

From this default page, Perry’s face becomes the guide to the exclusive cinematographic content; readers are instructed to tap her eyes, her ears, her lips or her forehead to get a closer, exclusive view at [photographer Steven] Klein and Perry’s world. Three of the pieces of cover content are beautifully staged, gif-like moving images that play on a loop, while the fourth is a music video-esque short film.

Klein worked with NYC-based studio The Mill to create the cover. The September issue of W also some other bits of AR wizardry, and all of the issue’s digital content is also available on the magazine’s website.

“We come from a high-end visual effects world, and this level of aesthetic in AR was the challenge,” added Sallyann Houghton, executive producer at The Mill. “That’s what’s been the excitement for us — emulating print in the moving image.”

There are three other stories that take advantage of the technology throughout the September issue, including a feature on the last living working chimpanzee, which is paired with a short narrated science fiction short story; a fashion editorial by Mert and Marcus that allows models in the city-girl photographs to showcase their sassy, brusque personas; and another fashion editorial which, unlike the others, which unlock videos, simply shuffles the images around right there on the page thanks to the work of a collage artist.

The Perry feature is live on W’s website.

Volvo and The Weather Channel Plan Big AR/VR Plays for Upcoming Eclipse

Volvo (in conjunction with CNN) and The Weather Channel have interesting plans to leverage AR and VR during TV coverage of “The Great American Eclipse” later this month. As AdWeek’s AJ Katz reported:

When CNN’s livestream of the eclipse enters a commercial break, CNN’s brand studio Courageous will produce live ads for Volvo in 4K virtual reality and 360-degree video across all of CNN’s digital and social platforms.

This will be the first of a larger live ads effort from CNN parent company Turner and the Courageous studio.

This particular campaign centers on a 360-degree view of the eclipse and helps celebrate the 360-degree camera feature in Volvo’s all-new 2018 XC60.

I’ll admit I was surprised by that last bit: Advertisers are so often willing to push, shall we say, less than obvious product tie-ins that the direct link between 360 video of the eclipse and Volvo’s 360-degree camera is refreshingly obvious.

On the day of the eclipse, Courageous will station four cameras in different locations around the country where they will film influencers, sharing their perspective on the significance of the eclipse as it happens.

… Each will arrive at the eclipse viewing location in a XC60. The cars will be equipped with 4K VR and 360-degree cameras to help capture the commercial.

It’ll be interesting to see what Volvo airs live during CNN’s coverage (when viewership will likely be at its highest) and what they do after the fact with the 4K VR and 360-degree video footage.

The Weather Channel’s AR/VR plans are quite a bit vaguer, at least as reported by Katz:

In addition to stationing meteorologists across the country, TWC will also deploy its augmented reality technology to take viewers into space and help those watching at home understand the science behind this extraordinary event.

“Our Total Solar Eclipse experience will span from live broadcasting across the country augmented reality technology in-studio, to sweepstakes for a once in a lifetime opportunity to experience the eclipse from 35,000 feet,” Weather Channel’s svp of live programming Nora Zimmett told Adweek.

But, hey, at least TWC has added their own brand name to the eclipse hype! Seriously, though, I hope they pull off something cool, because using AR to “take viewers into space” and help folks understand the science behind the eclipse sounds pretty awesome.

The eclipse will be viewable over parts of the United States on Monday, August 21st.

Report: AR/VR Spending Will Double Through 2021

Ry Crist, CNET:

Worldwide spending on virtual and augmented reality is expected to double each year through 2021, say the analysts at IDC, a market research firm based in Framingham, Massachusetts. According to their math, total spending will increase from $11.4 billion in 2017 to $215 billion in 2021, with a compound annual growth rate of 113.2 percent.

This absolutely echoes what I’ve been hearing. Barring a significant economic event that curtails global spending (which, frankly, is quite possible), the money that’s already flowing into AR and VR will only flow more readily over the next three to five years.

Consumer sales for things like headsets and games are currently the top driver of overall spending, followed by sales in the manufacturing and retail sectors. In the US, some of those sectors could ultimately overtake consumer sales by 2021.

Consumer interest in, and spending on, VR will climb steadily, but I don’t think headsets will be the new smartphone anytime soon. That said, expect more “consumer sales drive AR/VR growth!” headlines over the next few years as sales of AR-ready iPhones inform analysts’ reports. I’d argue that these numbers will be somewhat artificially inflated, as the percentage of consumers who buy new iPhones specifically for Augmented Reality applications will be rather low.

“Other segments like government, transportation, and education will utilize the transformative capabilities of these technologies,” said Marcus Torchia, research director of IDC Customer Insights & Analysis.

This is where the big, dull action will be. Microsoft is already building a healthy Hololens business in the enterprise. Nobody outside the enterprise talks about it because enterprise tech is “dull” and consumer tech is “sexy.” But serious money is being invested in practical innovations built on AR and XR (mixed reality) technologies, and big corporations are betting on those innovations paying dividends in the form of more efficient training, logistics, and business processes.

AR will generate lots of buzz over the next 12 months thanks to iOS 11 and ARKit. What consumers do with it after that remains to be seen. But the money will continue to flow into AR and XR for the enterprise, at least for another three to five years.

RED’s Enormous Holographic Phone Previewed in Video

YouTuber extraordinaire MKBHD (aka Marques Brownlee) got his hands on a few prototypes of RED’s forthcoming Hydrogen holographic pocket digital cinema phone. Brownlee made a video.

The phone looks enormous and dumb. You can watch the video for yourself, or just scan TechCrunch’s summary and move on with your life:

Brownlee, though he says he was merely at a loss for words, doesn’t seem particularly blown away. It’s easy to imagine why: small glasses-free 3D displays came and went not because they didn’t work but because they aren’t compelling. If this is just a high-fidelity version of a technology that failed for a dozen reasons, it’s hard to muster any enthusiasm.

Hydrogen will ship sometime in the future and cost far too much. A few movie directors will probably buy them, use them a few times, and go back to their iPhones.

Apple Applies for AR Glasses Patent

Jack Purcher, Patently Apple:

Apple acquired Metaio the creator of ‘Thermal Touch’ and a new Augmented Reality Interface for Wearables and beyond back in 2015. Their technology is thought to be behind Apple’s push into augmented reality and ARKit. This year a Metaio patent application surfaced under Apple for moving furniture in augmented reality. Apple was also granted a patent for indoor navigation that covered new capabilities for a future iDevice camera allowing it to recognize building names or paintings and then adding AR identifying markers on the user’s iDevice photos. Today another original Metaio patent application under Apple has surfaced relating augmented reality. More specifically it covers a method for representing points of interest in a view of a real environment on a screen of an iPhone with interaction functionality. The buzz is that the patent covers AR smartglasses as noted in our cover graphic, something that Apple has been adding to a series of new and updated trademarks of late ( onetwothree and four).

Worth noting that Apple applies for, and is granted, plenty of patents that never translate into shipping products.