Study Confirms Young People Get VR, Old Folks Don’t

Clickbait headline much? Anyway … A new study about VR use in America leads me to an inference that’s entirely unsubstantiated but probably true, anyway. (Trigger warning, Sarcasm ahead, Also a kernel of truth)

Rebecca Hills-Duty, VRFocus:

The VR/AR Insights Consortium, a group that comprises representatives from the likes of Turner, Warner Bros, and the VR Society have released a report in conjunction with Magid the sheds light on consumer use of VR and its various applications. The study was based on results gathered from 2,000 U.S-based consumers. Its headline statistic showed that 22% of VR users have used Netflix VR at some point, compared with the next most popular app, Minecraft VR at 20%.

My eight year-old son plays Minecraft. His grandfather had never heard of it until a few weeks ago, and even then didn’t put the name “Minecraft” together with the game he’s watched his grandson play. Ergo, my sweeping generalization:

Minecraft is probably popular on VR because it’s very popular, period, kids are interested in new tech like VR, and Minecraft is available on the major VR platforms. So when a kid straps in and sees Minecraft advertised on the welcome deck of Gear VR or Vive or what have you, she wants to check it out.

Netflix is probably popular on VR for the exact same reasons, except applied to all ages. I’ll now stretch things a little to make my argument: Kids probably don’t stick around Netflix VR for long because the experience is passive and easily replicated outside of VR. Since VR isn’t as popular as smartphones and computers just yet, most households that have a VR rig probably only have one, but have multiple other Netflix-capable devices. So kids’ available VR time is probably scarcer than other available screen time, and they know better than to waste it watching videos they can watch later on the boring old iPad.

Ergo, they do other, more VR-specific stuff. Like Minecraft, which is a little overwhelming and mind-blowing in VR (at least the first few times you try it).

But grown-ups who try VR are less adventurous and (just to wrongly generalize a little more) more easily disoriented and made nauseous. So they stick to what they know: Reruns of Frankie and Grace made new again by the excitement of googles, earphones, and their choice of digitally rendered luxe media room backdrops.

Just a theory.